Hypermiling in a Model 3

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Nagaman
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Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by Nagaman »

Being retired we do a lot of ‘pottering around’ @ 80-90 kph and just wondering if anyone has done a max range test of any sort, particularly in the SR+ ?.

MrD
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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by MrD »

In another forum "Lex" posted actual 350kM range in a SR+, two adults, 2 children with luggage at 90kph on a coastal drive. Of course, you should only 'Hypermile' when absolutely necessary (100% to 0%) and generally aim for 90% to 10% for battery health, contingencies (head winds, roadwork or other diversions) and stress free touring.
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Nagaman
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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by Nagaman »

MrD wrote:
Wed, 04 Dec 2019, 09:17
In another forum "Lex" posted actual 350kM range in a SR+, two adults, 2 children with luggage at 90kph on a coastal drive. Of course, you should only 'Hypermile' when absolutely necessary (100% to 0%) and generally aim for 90% to 10% for battery health, contingencies (head winds, roadwork or other diversions) and stress free touring.
Thanks Chris, I’m more interested in the average WH/km rather than 100%-0% range.
One interesting (to me at least) example is a trip over the 6000 ft Mt Hotham with a relatively short, steep/slow windy climb and a faster, longer and straighter descent.
Is one direction better than the other for total range?.

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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by mikedufty »

In theory the steep climb - gentle descent should be better, since you are not wasting the power that went into gaining altitude on brakes/regen inefficiencies. Would be more interesting to hear from someone who has tried it though.
On the same theory on a bicycle I should put in max effort on the uphills and just coast down but I always do the opposite because it feels better.

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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by MrD »

Hi Guys - I can confirm that a steep climb at gentle speed....then a long gradual descent works best for Hypermilling. My example is Hartley to Penrith (compared to the reverse) - with a short steep climb at 60kph to Mt Victoria....then the long coast downhill to Penrith. A long downhill descent at the end of a trip is useful when planning a Hypermilling trip - such as reaching the fast chargers at Bathurst from Yetholme (25kms) with virtually no depletion on your predicted range.
MrD-85-TSLA

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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by Nagaman »

So does one pedal driving regeneration cope with the steep bits or do you need the wasteful friction brakes as well ?.

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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by dgh853 »

Tesla Bjorn did a range test of an SR+ at 90kph at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gpvg2f7HyQs. Average Wh/km was 122.

You can use https://abetterrouteplanner.com/ and set speed limits and your preferred routes to see what it believes the efficiency and range will be. I've found it to be pretty accurate for the Model 3 SR+.
2019 Tesla Model 3 SR+
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Nagaman
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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by Nagaman »

I’m wondering if the SR+ will do the Bendigo - Mildura 400 km @ 80 kph......obviously states at 100%.
The alternative to the Horsham diversion is via the Swan Hill council Tesla 22 kWh charger which can be ICED by the unobservant.
Any thoughts on whether it’s possible ?.
Alternatively there are some destination chargers enroute.......is it a normal practice to ‘buy’ an hour ?.

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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by EVdownUnder »

Nagaman wrote:
Thu, 09 Jan 2020, 18:53
I’m wondering if the SR+ will do the Bendigo - Mildura 400 km @ 80 kph......obviously states at 100%.
The alternative to the Horsham diversion is via the Swan Hill council Tesla 22 kWh charger which can be ICED by the unobservant.
Any thoughts on whether it’s possible ?.
Alternatively there are some destination chargers enroute.......is it a normal practice to ‘buy’ an hour ?.
I'm probably going to get hammered for this comment :? but my Kona can do Bendigo - Mildura at 100kph, and at $10'000 less than the SR+, that is a lot of free lunches!
And the Kona can charge on most Tesla destination chargers without any adaptors, which is a serious bonus as they are the most common chargers in the countryside.
My longest ride so far was Belgrave - Portland at 440km and I had about 20km left (perfect day using no climate control). I know it's not a Tesla but the Kona is the next best thing in my humble opinion.
Ceramic blue Kona Highlander - Current stats:
As of 06 March 2020 (6 months of ownership)
20'142km at an average speed of 48.3km/h
125Wh/km from new

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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by Nagaman »

I might have bought a Kona Electric if it hadn’t been so obvious that the dealership wasn’t interested in selling them and that Hyundai (and KIA) aren’t interested in supplying a significant demand.
You could have any colour you wanted as long as it was drab grey and dark interior......the message was pretty clear.

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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by EVdownUnder »

You have a point. Unfortunately I feel that this is mostly due to our pathetic government who does not care one little bit about pollution.
For a car manufacturer, why sell EVs in a country happy to receive any old dirty diesel when the EU emission standards are getting so tight that they have no choice but to sell EVs and hybrids to reach the average 95g of CO2 per km target.
We are so far down the food chain that I'm guessing we are not about to see any of the upcoming great EVs in the pipeline in any significant numbers.
So yes, kudos to Tesla for acknowledging that we exist and that some of us want EVs.
The car I really need for my job is a basic station wagon with decent ground clearance like the practical Subaru Forester, with 500km of real world range and below $50k.
The VW Vizzion looks great but I can't get up my driveway with that. The cheapest Tesla with the range I need is $95k... Couldn't justify this. And sadly, no air suspension (or just a bit more ground clearance) on the M3.
Maybe the Model Y will be my next car. But only if the long range is less than $80k. Unlikely but I live in hope.
Ceramic blue Kona Highlander - Current stats:
As of 06 March 2020 (6 months of ownership)
20'142km at an average speed of 48.3km/h
125Wh/km from new

ev28wa
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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by ev28wa »

EVdownUnder wrote:
Fri, 10 Jan 2020, 20:29
You have a point. Unfortunately I feel that this is mostly due to our pathetic government who does not care one little bit about pollution.
For a car manufacturer, why sell EVs in a country happy to receive any old dirty diesel when the EU emission standards are getting so tight that they have no choice but to sell EVs and hybrids to reach the average 95g of CO2 per km target.
We are so far down the food chain that I'm guessing we are not about to see any of the upcoming great EVs in the pipeline in any significant numbers.
So yes, kudos to Tesla for acknowledging that we exist and that some of us want EVs.
The car I really need for my job is a basic station wagon with decent ground clearance like the practical Subaru Forester, with 500km of real world range and below $50k.
The VW Vizzion looks great but I can't get up my driveway with that. The cheapest Tesla with the range I need is $95k... Couldn't justify this. And sadly, no air suspension (or just a bit more ground clearance) on the M3.
Maybe the Model Y will be my next car. But only if the long range is less than $80k. Unlikely but I live in hope.
I think for most people with realistic budgets the next 5 years will be the glory days of the hybrid while we phase into pure EV. Check out the new Rav4 Hybrid although its still petrol only about 4.5-5L/100 which is great for a big SUV.

Nagaman
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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by Nagaman »

I think for most people with realistic budgets the next 5 years will be the glory days of the hybrid while we phase into pure EV. Check out the new Rav4 Hybrid although its still petrol only about 4.5-5L/100 which is great for a big SUV.
The dealerships hope they can stick to anything that has a service schedule for the extra income.

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brendon_m
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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by brendon_m »

Yeah, I notice that the rav4 prime isn't up for sale in Australia.

Nagaman
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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by Nagaman »

I’m not sure how you get great economy in a hybrid if you spend most of your time on long country driving (using the petrol engine) such as we do.
Toyota doesn’t use lithium in it’s small battery when I investigated a few months ago.

I regard Toyota as distractors rather than achievers these days........they have a high cost base to protect.
A painful fighting withdrawal ahead.

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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by antiscab »

Nagaman wrote:
Sun, 12 Jan 2020, 05:39
I’m not sure how you get great economy in a hybrid if you spend most of your time on long country driving (using the petrol engine) such as we do.
By using an atkins cycle engine instead of an Otto. Atkins cycle is significantly more efficient, but has far lower peak power.

Most of the fuel economy improvement in a hybrid is from running atkins cycle. It's why even hybrids with dud batteries still get good economy
Matt
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brendon_m
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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by brendon_m »

How much better fuel economy can you get with a simple plug on the side as well? Its not like Toyota haven't r+d'd and built the cars, they just haven't brought them here.
Also the later Toyotas use lithium batteries (specifically in the plug in's but possibly in the latest generation hybrids as well)

Nagaman
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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by Nagaman »

I saw a YouTube piece on coasting where you 2 seconds in the Model 3 and that disconnects the drive completely.
The mere thought makes me nervous .
Last edited by Nagaman on Tue, 21 Jan 2020, 05:44, edited 1 time in total.

Nagaman
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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by Nagaman »

.....select R on the move heading downhill.....

Nagaman
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Re: Hypermiling in a Model 3

Post by Nagaman »

Well it wasn’t hypermiling but our 270 km round trip to Melbourne today saw 111wh/km with a tailwind down and only 125 back into the stiff headwind.
Acc/autopilot behind trucks at 100 kph was very helpful I suspect.

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