Kona EV Real World Range Experience

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Mrburns
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Re: Kona EV Real World Range Experience

Post by Mrburns »

Peter C in Canberra wrote:
Mon, 06 Jan 2020, 07:10
The energy required for seat heating and cooling is far less than for cabin heating or cooling, and a very good idea in an EV.
Just be aware in the user manual it says to not run the seat cooling with out the cabin cooling on

Peter C in Canberra
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Re: Kona EV Real World Range Experience

Post by Peter C in Canberra »

Mrburns wrote:
Mon, 06 Jan 2020, 08:42
Peter C in Canberra wrote:
Mon, 06 Jan 2020, 07:10
The energy required for seat heating and cooling is far less than for cabin heating or cooling, and a very good idea in an EV.
Just be aware in the user manual it says to not run the seat cooling with out the cabin cooling on
Thanks. I had not noticed that. I wonder why not. All I can think of is that the fan might need cooled air to prevent its motor overheating.
Daihatsu charade conversion 2009-18, Mitsubishi iMiEV 2013-2019, Holden Volt 2018-2019, Hyundai Kona 2019-present on the ACT's 100% renewable electricity.

rhills
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Re: Kona EV Real World Range Experience

Post by rhills »

I would guess that the heat extracted from the seat has to go somewhere. If it just exits into the cabin it's not going to contribute to overall cooling much I'd have thought.
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davidEV
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Re: Kona EV Real World Range Experience

Post by davidEV »

I live in Toowoomba which is on the range some 600M to 700M above sea level. I have never had range anxiety in the Kona Electric. This was the reason that I was drawn to this EV with a 64KWH battery. Regenerative braking plays a big part when driving with an electric vehicle. A real world example is travel 50KM down to Crowley vale uses only 4.8KWH because of regenerative braking. The return 50KM trip up the range using the same route and driving speeds requires 10KWH. One needs to factor in the energy use when returning. It is not a problem because the Queensland electric highway has a fast charge station at the university outside of Gatton.
The aircon in the Kona is very good, which is needed in Queensland. The energy it uses depends to a degree on the setting and the driver only setting is handy. My observation seems to indicate the AC reduces distance range 10 to 15 percent.
One benefit of living on a hill one can generate great efficiency at times. Please see screenshot from Hyundai autolink
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Mrburns
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Re: Kona EV Real World Range Experience

Post by Mrburns »

Peter C in Canberra wrote:
Mon, 06 Jan 2020, 07:10

Thanks. I had not noticed that. I wonder why not. All I can think of is that the fan might need cooled air to prevent its motor overheating.
I would think it would be more to do with the minimum amount of cooling that the aircon compressor could supply, and the seat cooler fans probably pulls cold air from the main cabin aircon and with out cabin fan on not enough may cause it to freeze up.

[ Edited Coulomb: removed excess quote tags. ]

Xap
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Re: Kona EV Real World Range Experience

Post by Xap »

As EV enthusiasts, we all know or have experienced how fantastic regenerative breaking can be in providing free charging for our cars. It's always good to know that while consumption goes up when heading uphill, some of that will be recaptured on the way back down, as we can see from davidEV's post above.

On the way back from Bathurst to Sydney today, I wanted to see how low I could get the consumption over the Blue Mountains.
I reset the trip computer in Blackheath, and took the picture below in Penrith, just under 55 kms distance, and approximately 1020 metres drop in elevation.
Average speed of 60kph, outside temp was 19 degrees at the start, and up to 30 degrees at the end. Aircon used for about 20 kms.
I was expecting 5 kWh/100kms, so this result was very surprising, and no hypermiling!

super efficient.jpeg
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I would love to hear of others experience.

How low can you go? :D

Peter C in Canberra
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Re: Kona EV Real World Range Experience

Post by Peter C in Canberra »

Xap wrote:
Wed, 19 Feb 2020, 19:45
I reset the trip computer in Blackheath, and took the picture below in Penrith, just under 55 kms distance, and approximately 1020 metres drop in elevation.
I have not done this trip in our Kona but in our previous Holden Volt, we left Leura nominally fully charged with an EV range of about 65km showing which climbed to 114 and regen remained strong all the way down. At the bottom of the mountains we turned right and got almost to the southern highlands on our way back to Canberra before the petrol engine came on. The most interesting thing about it was that it showed that the Volt really does have quite a lot of headroom above the nominally full charge that can absorb regen. In order to maximise battery life, the Volt uses the middle 10.5kWh out of a 16.5kWh battery. It never charges all the way to really full and it never discharges completely. Instead it reaches a set minimum at which point the petrol generator turns on.
Daihatsu charade conversion 2009-18, Mitsubishi iMiEV 2013-2019, Holden Volt 2018-2019, Hyundai Kona 2019-present on the ACT's 100% renewable electricity.

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