What is the most basic setup possible?

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gregted
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What is the most basic setup possible?

Post by gregted » Tue, 31 Jul 2012, 19:32

I was wondering if someone has the ultimate basic setup for an ev conversion as in new equipment needed.

Watched all the videos like Forkenswift and the like.

This is probably going to make a lot of you cringe, but here we go...

Old working 48 volt fork lift motor. ( Free )

Coupler between the electric motor shaft and the spicket shaft on the gearbox. ( easy enough to fabricate )

4 used but usable 12 volt deep cycle golf cart batteries. ( $8 each = $32)

Something to control the voltage supplied like a pwm or a dc motor controller. ( $40 kit from Jaycar but beefed up )

Cables and lugs.

I am aware this could be limited in top speed and range but why wouldn't this get me on the road?
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zeva
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What is the most basic setup possible?

Post by zeva » Tue, 31 Jul 2012, 20:53

*cringe* Image

But what you suggest is probably on the right track for absolute cheapest EV. The main caveat I can think of is that any road-going vehicles kind of need a minimum performance to be "roadworthy" (either to pass licensing, or just to not be too annoying to other motorists), say able to go 60km/h, and 0-60 in 10 seconds.

Even in a small car that'd probably require ~20kW peak (400A @ 48V) with a few kW continuous. This puts a decent size requirement on your forklift motor, performance requirement from your batteries - and a 48V 400A motor controller is not a trivial thing to DIY, so hunting down a second hand Alltrax (or similar) would be easier/safer/more reliable.

And even then it's hill-climbing performance would be atrocious.. (It's easy to use 50kW+ continuous while driving up hills.)

The other concern is that even a cheap EV will probably take a hundred hours of your time to build, so for most people it's worth spending a bit of money on decent components so you're not putting so much time and effort into achieving a mediocre result!
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gregted
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What is the most basic setup possible?

Post by gregted » Tue, 31 Jul 2012, 21:31

Whew!!!
That's a much nicer response than I expected Ian.. Image

Yeah. I knew this idea was going to be very limited but just threw it out there to see what you all thought.

I just re-read the 3 amigos thread on ecomodder..

http://ecomodder.com/blog/cheap-diy-electric-car/

and have to agree wholeheartedly with one of the re-occuring comments I have heard from almost all ev modders that this forum has the nicest people.
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woody
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What is the most basic setup possible?

Post by woody » Tue, 31 Jul 2012, 22:23

The car I drive most is the cortina pictured to the left. It's still on petrol, 1.2 L Kent engine with 48.5 HP (peak) = 36kW to move around 950kg including driver and luggage. Power in a petrol motor is roughly proportional to RPMS, and really revving it, I can keep up with people driving normally in sydney. It's quite marginal.

I think the weak link with your setup will be the batteries - to get 20kW / 400A out of 2nd hand batteries will be hard work.
Planned EV: '63 Cortina using AC and LiFePO4 Battery Pack

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Johny
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What is the most basic setup possible?

Post by Johny » Tue, 31 Jul 2012, 22:48

I'm assuming that this is the motor you pulled from the forklift described in this thread. Motor No. 27??? (in the pdf I posted).

If so, it looks like just under 10kW at 1050RPM which makes it around 90NM torque. But 1050RPM isn't going to go very fast even with overdrive. To get speed you are going to need voltage.

Based on the 319mm diameter (can you verify this?) you can probably get lots more torque out of it - that won't be the problem IMO.
The batteries, as woody says, are probably past 50% capacity and may severely droop with the 400A load you need to place on them to "get up a hill" - even a modest hill.

Other than a "round to the corner shop" vehicle this will be a disapointment to drive (IMO).

gregted
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What is the most basic setup possible?

Post by gregted » Wed, 01 Aug 2012, 04:02

Hey Woody,

Love the look of the old Cortina.

Maybe converting the older cars like this will be a way of saving some of our history and at the same time saving the future.

Hey that wasn't bad. Have to write that down.....

I've got a 1929 Chrysler tourer I am restoring that might wind up a sparky yet..

Johny.... the motor is 200mm diameter, 315mm length 52 kilos and plate on side states 10kw. This is only the hydraulic pump motor. The main drive motor is much bigger but I don't have it yet.

I guess what I am trying to achieve here is a conversion for the absolute minimum cost just to prove it can be done by others on an extremely tight budget.

WE are a 1 income family and projects must be extremely cost effective to pass the minister for war and finance.

I know this has been done....forkenswift... love that name.. mine might be the forkenute... Just off to the shop in the forkenute, honey... he, he...

I think my current fuel guzzler, 1990 courier ute is sucking down about 12.4l/100km. This works out to be 0.124L/1 Km. So the round trip for work is 34kms which equates to 4.216 Liters per trip.

At $1.55/liter this means a trip to work and back costs me $6.53/day.

$6.53 times 5 days equals $32.67/week or $1,699.04 per year.

We are getting a 5kw inverter and 16 panels installed so that could be a potential saving of nearly $1700 a year, so it isn't a real hard decision after all.

Even without the new panels it is still cheaper to charge up at home. Our entire power bill for the last quarter was $6.00/day so if we use twice the amount of power used by the entire household and the welder in the shed to charge up my ev, we would still be in front.

Have I missed something.....
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Johny
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What is the most basic setup possible?

Post by Johny » Wed, 01 Aug 2012, 15:16

gregted wrote:Johny.... the motor is 200mm diameter, 315mm length 52 kilos and plate on side states 10kw. This is only the hydraulic pump motor. The main drive motor is much bigger but I don't have it yet.
OK, that's the pump motor which has a rated speed of 1600 RPM at 9.6kW which make it about 58NM torque. At 96V it would do OK with a gearbox - not quick - but OK. Do you think you can get that main drive motor?

Edit (again): I was wrong - pump motors appear to often be series types.
Last edited by Johny on Wed, 01 Aug 2012, 05:31, edited 1 time in total.

gregted
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What is the most basic setup possible?

Post by gregted » Wed, 01 Aug 2012, 15:44

I can get the main drive motor but have to wait until the whs bloke has a day off.

The bloke who has the fork is happy for me to work on it but his mate is a bit more anal. Doesn't like me working under a 4 tonne fork. No sense of adventure.

The owner wants to chain it to the bed of the truck at the back and jack the forks up and sit the front wheels on hardwood pallets before I get under it but he still wasn't happy.

My idea was to tip it on it's side and chain it to the truck but still not good enough.

Like I said, no sense of adventure... Waiting.... Waiting...

Meanwhile back at the ranch, still looking for a donor mighty boy. Have advertised in the Traders Mate. Free advertising. Gotta love that.

Looking at 2 for $1200. One is manual and rust bucket. Other is auto and not bad. Might be the best deal yet. Convert manual and drive auto in the mean time and save some fuel.

Bloke rang last night and wants $3500 for unfinished, unregistered mighty boy. Never know until you ask, I suppose...
The future isn't what it used to be.

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