$8/L for petrol!

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Thalass
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$8/L for petrol!

Post by Thalass »

This has been all over the news (or, rather, the same script and footage has been shown on at least three or four news presentations) today. Including someone from (if I recall correctly) a CSIRO forum thing saying that the way to go in the future is electric bikes and small cars (though I would also say large EVs and SHEVs).


$8/L! That would mean $512 to completely fill the 64L tank on my Outback! If I replace the price I paid last time with $8/L it comes to $472.80 for 59.1L, and 82.9c/Km! (currently it's 16.3c/Km or so - a difference of 66.6c/Km, amusingly enough)

Even if electricity doubled in cost, it'd still be only 6c/km! And you can make your own electricity!



Craziness. But at least someone who (via official channels) has the ear of the government has the idea of electric cars in his head.
I'll drive an electric vehicle one day.

Benonymous
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$8/L for petrol!

Post by Benonymous »

The market will have moved long before petrol reaches $8 per litre. There is going to be a big shift when it hits $2 per litre. People will be buying smaller more economical cars and in the medium term, less demand will force a price drop. The japanese car industry got a foothold in the USA during the oil crisis and the yards full of unsold V8 SUV's and pickup trucks is testament to the swift way that the market responds to a problem.

I expect to see a lot more LPG conversions and in time electric conversions. Some friends of mine have opened up an LPG conversion business and its going really well.

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$8/L for petrol!

Post by zeva »

I certainly hope so we see a big shift towards transport powered by renewable sources in the coming years - even if it's simply as a result of ever-worsening fuel prices.

Truth be told it's all our commuter vehicles which are the easiest problem to tackle. As many early-adopters are already demonstrating, battery electric vehicles are an entirely feasible alternative for city driving.

More of a concern are our long distance transportation needs, such as freight trains and air travel, for which we currently have no viable options other than using fossil fuels! One way or another, it's reasonable to expect that everything which depends on these will get much more expensive by 2020..

But as Thalass said recently in another thread.. Perhaps that'll just result in more self-sufficient mini cities, with greater bioregionalism.. Which is not such a bad move anyway.
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$8/L for petrol!

Post by Striker »

zeva wrote:result in more self-sufficient mini cities, with greater bioregionalism..


Back to the days when people knew their neighbours, said hi in the streets, and looked out for one-another?

Bring it on.

--Striker.

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Thalass
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$8/L for petrol!

Post by Thalass »

zeva wrote:
More of a concern are our long distance transportation needs, such as freight trains and air travel, for which we currently have no viable options other than using fossil fuels! One way or another, it's reasonable to expect that everything which depends on these will get much more expensive by 2020..
Yeah. And when aviation is too expensive, and people stop flying, I'm out of a job! Though it'll be a very bad day when a mining company can't afford to fly workers up north...

zeva wrote: But as Thalass said recently in another thread.. Perhaps that'll just result in more self-sufficient mini cities, with greater bioregionalism.. Which is not such a bad move anyway.


We are kinda moving in that direction with these new semi-gated communities (like ellenbrook), which have most things people need within or nearby to them - except farmland of course (though we do have wineries around here that could be converted to food production).

I'll drive an electric vehicle one day.

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